#MH370: Search update for Saturday, April 12

April 12, 2014

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Good morning:

A Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777

Acoustic data analysis continues.

No pings from the black boxes have been detected since the towed pinger locator detected signals on Tuesday. The previously reported signals picked up by the sonar buoys have been analyzed and excluded as electronic signals from the black boxes.

The Chief Coordinator of the Joint Agency Coordination Centre, Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston (Ret’d), said an initial assessment of the possible signal detected by a RAAF AP-3C Orion aircraft yesterday afternoon has been determined as not related to an aircraft underwater locator beacon.

“The Australian Joint Acoustic Analysis Centre has analysed the acoustic data and confirmed that the signal reported in the vicinity of the Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield is unlikely to be related to the aircraft black boxes,” Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston (Ret’d), said.

Here’s the media release for today.

Media Release
12 April 2014—am

Up to nine military aircraft, one civil aircraft and 14 ships will assist in today’s search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

Today the Australian Maritime Safety Authority has planned a visual search area totalling approximately 41,393 square kilometres. The centre of the search areas lies approximately 2331 kilometres north west of Perth.

Today, Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield continues more focused sweeps with the Towed Pinger Locator to try and locate further signals related to the aircraft’s black boxes. The AP-3C Orions continue their acoustic search, working in conjunction with Ocean Shield. The oceanographic ship HMS Echo is also working in the area with Ocean Shield. This work continues in an effort to narrow the underwater search area for when the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle is deployed. There have been no confirmed acoustic detections over the past 24 hours.

The weather forecast for today is 10 knot south easterly winds with isolated showers, sea swells up to one metre and visibility of five kilometres in showers.

Aircraft and ships reported spotting a number of objects during yesterday’s search, but only a small number were able to be recovered. None of the recovered items were confirmed to be associated with MH370.

The underwater search area is approximately 14,800 feet below the surface of the ocean and about the same size as the city of Los Angeles. That’s why they are going to continue to listen for pings until they are satisfied that the batteries have expired. The more pings they detect, the easier it will be to shrink the search area and locate the black boxes.

The Bluefin 21’s sonar can scan only about 100 meters to each side and its lights can only illuminate a few meters. The maximum depth at which it can operate is 4,500 meters and some areas of the search zone are deeper. Because of these limitations, they will continue to listen for pings until they are satisfied that they know the location of the black boxes or the batteries have died. The boxes are not going anywhere, so they are not going to risk losing or damaging the Bluefin 21 during a premature dive.

The searchers are also concerned about the firmness of the ocean bottom, which they believe to be composed of a layer of silt, approximately 75 feet deep. They fear the wreckage, including the black boxes, may have disappeared into the silt muffling and misdirecting the pings while also making it difficult to see any wreckage.

You are up to date.

Photo by Aero Icarus released under a Creative Commons Share Alike license.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

If you appreciate what we do, please make a donation today. If everyone who has not made a donation were to donate $5 or $10 we would not have to ask for any donations.

Thank you,

Fred


#MH370: Sonobuoys detect possible signals from black boxes

April 10, 2014

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Good morning:

I have more good news to report in the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370.

CNN is reporting this morning that an Australian P3 Orion has picked up signals during Thursday’s search from some of the 84 sonobuoys that were dropped into ocean in the vicinity of the location where the Ocean Shield picked up signals from the black boxes with the towed pinger locater (TPL).

Sonobuoys, which float on the surface, dangle a hydrophone (i.e., an underwater microphone) attached to a 1,000 foot cable. The sonobuoy broadcasts any radio signal picked up by the hydrophone.

Searchers are using the sonobuoys to precisely locate the black boxes on the ocean bottom, which is 14,800 feet deep.

The electronic information picked up by the sonobuoys will be evaluated Thursday night.

Depending on the results, the Ocean Shield may deploy the Bluefin 21 to find the wreckage and and photograph it.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

We work hard for you. This is our 966th post. If you appreciate what we do, please make a donation.

Fred


%d bloggers like this: