Featuring: Malisha is in the House with a Tale worthy of the Mullah Nasrudin

November 19, 2012

I love humor, especially dark humor, because it helps to keep me sane in troubled times and we are in troubled times. George Zimmerman’s incomprehensible and indefensible murder of Trayvon Martin is but one of many examples of the insanity in which we find ourselves. We cannot pretend that it isn’t there because pretending will not banish it from our lives. Fear, hatred and blaming the other only adds to our problems.

Like it or not, we are being inexorably forced by the growing disorder in our lives to acknowledge that we, collectively speaking, are the problem and the solution. We have a lot of bad ideas that manifest daily in senseless acts of violence on an individual and global scale.

We have run out of room to hide from each other here in the fabled and symbolic Garden of Eden that we call Earth.

Each of us is a part of the problems and the problems we face are bigger than any one person can solve. Yet, there are solutions apparent to anyone with eyes to see.

We are going to have to work together on a global scale to create peace and harmony, but the path begins at home, which is our very own self.

Until you see yourself in the other, you cannot see yourself.

Pain is pain, but humor softens it and Malisha is quite accomplished at seeing humor in tragedy. Here, she recreates George Zimmerman’s pathetic tale of searching for an address to conceal that the real address he is searching for has materialized into a person whom he is hunting.

He will find him, but he will not find the answer he seeks.

George, to NEN:

Um, Hello, this is George again. I have some addresses for you now.

Sean: Are these addresses where the guy is?

George: No, he ran. These assholes always get away. These are addresses where he is NOT.

Sean: OK, so what is your address George?

George: To be honest with you, I have a bad memory. Could we just skip to the addresses where the suspect is NOT? Because I remember THEM, now, and I don’t want to go back to my truck because then I’ll forget again.

Sean: OK, shoot.

George: Firssssst, one one, one oh, uh, Retreat View Circle, uh, tell them to go left, and…

Sean: That’s the club house?

George: Yeah, and he’s not there.

Sean: OK, where else isn’t he?

George: He’s… [slap slap, slap slap] shit… one two one one, uh…

Sean: George? Are you there?

George: Where?

Sean: Wherever you are now?

George: Just tell them to call me, OK?

Sean: Call you?

George: Yeah, call me maybe.

Sean: That’s a song, George.

George: Uh…well numbers all around, flying by, up and down,
Some as slow as Christmas coming, Some like the speed of sound, And we all wonder, what they mean, The highs, the lows, the in betweens, Most of them mean absolutely nothing But some of them mean everything…

Sean: George, do you see the suspicious guy?

George: Negative. Lost visual on the suspect. Sing a song of sixpence, pocket full of rye, four and twenty blackbirds baked into a pie,…

Sean: George, do you still want the officers to meet you there?

George: Rescue me, Come on and rescue me, Come on baby and rescue me, Come on baby and rescue me, ‘Coz I need you by my side, Can’t you see that I’m lonely, Rescue meeeeee…


Rabbi Hillel’s Three Questions: What Did He Mean?

July 31, 2012

I have always been drawn to the deeper questions in life and I spent quite a bit of my life defending clients charged with death penalty offenses and I confronted those questions on a daily basis. I am opposed to the death penalty in all cases.

I believe that, as long as we remain alive, we retain the capacity for redemption, no matter what we have done.

As we tread water waiting for Judge Lester’s decision on Friday regarding the defense motion to disqualify, I have taken the opportunity to establish some guidelines and rules for the site.

To further set the tone for a new way in the blogosphere to learn about law and grow in wisdom together, I decided to provoke some philosophical thought and discussion regarding Rabbi Hillel’s famous three questions.

Rabbi Hillel

Wikipedia states:

Hillel (הלל) (born Babylon traditionally c.110 BCE, died 10 CE[1] in Jerusalem) was a famous Jewish religious leader, one of the most important figures in Jewish history. He is associated with the development of the Mishnah and the Talmud. Renowned within Judaism as a sage and scholar, he was the founder of the House of Hillel school for Tannaïm (Sages of the Mishnah) and the founder of a dynasty of Sages who stood at the head of the Jews living in the land of Israel until roughly the fifth century of the Christian Era.

He is known for many things, including this expression of the Golden Rule:

“That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation; go and learn.

The man had a way of cutting through the bullshit and getting to the essence of things.

I do not mention him for any religious purpose. Instead, I mention him as a sage and, specifically, for the following three questions he asked his students.

If I am not for myself, who will be for me?

But if I am only for myself, who am I?

If not now, when?

What are your thoughts?


Brother Or Sister, Can You Spare 30 days?

March 20, 2012

(h/t to Crane-Station for recommending this short film by Joshua Weigel, who also directed the Butterfly Circus)

I remember reading about a person who voluntarily decided to experience visual blindness for 30 days. He cut a ping-pong ball in half, manufactured a pair of goggles, and wore them for the entire month.

That gave me an idea.

Why not do the same for a set of beliefs and witness how your personality and behavior change?

For example, I decided to assume that my spirit is immortal and voluntarily experiencing a finite existence in the physical dimension of space-time by inhabiting a form that consists of a physical body that comes with a mind and ego/personality.

I intentionally disconnected my sense of self from my mind and ego/personality and attached it to my spirit/soul.

Why not taste immortality?

Come on, don’t be afraid.

Give it a try.

What have you got to lose?

Except your fear of death, for starters.


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