Ebola Virus Disease a Crisis in West Africa

by Crane-Station

According to a report published in Business Insider on Monday titled, “Current Ebola Outbreak Is Now The Worst In History And ‘Totally Out Of Control’,” Doctors Without Borders’s Bart Janssens told the Associated Press that the current epidemic in Guinea is “now in a second wave” and that it is “totally out of control.” The World Health Organization (WHO) held a meeting on Monday, and posted information on the WHO website:

Ebola virus disease, West Africa – update

Disease Outbreak News
22 June 2014

Guinea

Between 16 and 18 June 2014, a total of 3 new cases and 3 deaths were reported from Gueckedou (3 cases and 0 death), Telimele (0 case and 2 deaths), and Boffa (0 cases and 1 death). This brings the cumulative number of cases and deaths reported from Guinea to 390 (258 confirmed, 88 probable, and 44 suspected) and 267 deaths.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

Highlights

-June 16, 2014, the Guinea Ministry of Health announced a total of 398 suspect and confirmed cases of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), including 264 fatal cases.

-Affected districts include Conakry, Guéckédou, Macenta, Kissidougou, Dabola, Djingaraye, Télimélé, Boffa, Dubreka, and Kouroussa (see map).
254 cases across Guinea have been confirmed by laboratory testing to be positive for Ebola virus infection.

-In Guinea’s capital city, Conakry, 68 suspect cases have been reported to meet the clinical definition for EHF, including 33 fatal cases.
June 17, 2014, the Ministry of Health and Sanitation of Sierra Leone reported a cumulative total of 97 clinical cases of EHF (including 92 laboratory confirmations) and 49 fatal cases according to WHO.

-June 16, 2014, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Liberia reported a cumulative total of 33 suspect and confirmed EHF cases, including 24 reported fatalities and 18 laboratory confirmations.

-Genetic analysis of the virus indicates that it is closely related (97% identical) to variants of Ebola virus (species Zaire ebolavirus) identified earlier in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Gabon (Baize et al. 2014External Web Site Icon).

-The Guinean Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Health and Sanitation of Sierra Leone, and the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Liberia are working with national and international partners to investigate and respond to the outbreak.

Ebola virus disease (EVD) or Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is a virus that has no known cure, but education remains important, as does the provision of care to patients that do become infected. Also, standard precautions are critical and require supplies. For the health care workers in the field to ensure their own protection, increased precautions and equipment are also necessary. In addition, there are only a few laboratories in the world that are equipped to handle and perform research on Ebola.

The virus was first reported in the Congo in 1976, and is considered to have come from fruit bats initially. Ebola is associated with very high death rate (up to 90 percent). Ebola Virus is named after the Ebola River, where the first outbreak occurred in the Congo.

Photographs on flickr, creative commons:

Ebola in West Africa by European Commission

Ebola in Guinea, a Doctors Without Borders worker in protective clothing, by European Commission.

Guardian on Monday:

global development
West Africa Ebola epidemic is ‘out of control’
MSF warns that doctors are struggling to contain second wave of disease in region amid poor monitoring and communication
• Tackling the Ebola epidemic in west Africa: immediate medical action is not enough

Unrelated:

Last Wednesday, two of the three Decorah Eagles, D-18 and D-19 fledged, and the third, D-20, fledged on June 20.

Unfortunately, a short time later, two of the juveniles, in separate incidents were found down. D-20, the youngest, was weak and hungry. RRP believes it is a female. They fed her, re-released her, and the eagle father then located her. The second eagle was found in a creek, and the vet determined by x-ray and exam, that there is a humerus fracture on the wing. The Decorah Eagle Juvenile is at Save Our Avian Resources (SOAR), a rescue in Iowa, where surgery is planned to pin the fracture.

~Update on the Decorah Juvenile Eagle: June 23, 2014~

From Kay Neumann, Executive Director, SOAR

“X-ray shows oblique humerus fracture about an inch from the shoulder joint. Dr. Dirks will do surgery on Wednesday to pin. Will get plenty of food and fluids in him/her between now and surgery”

[The humerus is the large bone between the coracoid (shoulder) and the radius and ulna (elbow)]

There are two sites to visit for updates on the Decorah Eagles:

Decorah Eagles on Facebook

SOAR on Facebook

3 Responses to Ebola Virus Disease a Crisis in West Africa

  1. pbsilk7 says:

    I get the feeling that its just another way of killing off a race. Its always some killer desease coming out of africa.

  2. crazy1946 says:

    Mz. Crane-Station thank you for taking your time to write this article today. With all the implications that the CIA was/is behind this virus (being developed as a weapon) and it was unwittingly released upon the inhabitants of that area, we as a nation need to demand action from our government to cease all biological weapon programs immediately..
    My heart goes out to the Eagles, and hope for their survival. You mentioned two of the three, is there news about the third one? I don’t do face book, so I have no access there. You and the Professor have a wonderful day, enjoy the hot, humid, and stormy weather that is so much in evidence this year… I’m getting to the point that I will have to devise some sort of cooling system (AC) if this weather continues. If block ice was not so expensive, I would go that route. Geo thermal is probably the ticket, but the thought of digging the holes with a shovel is not appealing to say the least. Oh well, things will change, right? Let’s just hope it is for the better…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: