Who should win the Nobel Peace Prize?

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Good morning:

The winner of the Nobel Peace Prize will be announced on Friday and I think it might be fun and productive to discuss and vote on who should be awarded the prize.

Wikipedia provides the following information about the prize:

According to Nobel’s will, the Peace Prize shall be awarded to the person who “shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses.”

Alfred Nobel’s will further specified that the prize be awarded by a committee of five people chosen by the Norwegian Parliament.

/snip/

Each year, the Norwegian Nobel Committee specifically invites qualified people to submit nominations for the Nobel Peace Prize. The statutes of the Nobel Foundation specify categories of individuals who are eligible to make nominations for the Nobel Peace Prize. These nominators are:

Members of national assemblies and governments and members of the Inter-Parliamentary Union

Members of the Permanent Court of Arbitration and the International Court of Justice at the Hague

Members of Institut de Droit International

University professors of history, social sciences, philosophy, law and theology, university presidents and directors of peace research and international affairs institutes

Former recipients, including board members of organizations that have previously received the prize
Present and past members of the Norwegian Nobel Committee

Former permanent advisers to the Norwegian Nobel Institute.

/snip/

Nominations are considered by the Nobel Committee at a meeting where a short list of candidates for further review is created. This short list is then considered by permanent advisers to the Nobel institute, which consists of the Institute’s Director and the Research Director and a small number of Norwegian academics with expertise in subject areas relating to the prize. Advisers usually have some months to complete reports, which are then considered by the Committee to select the laureate. The Committee seeks to achieve a unanimous decision, but this is not always possible. The Nobel Committee typically comes to a conclusion in mid-September, but occasionally the final decision has not been made until the last meeting before the official announcement at the beginning of October.

Here are five people who are considered heavy contenders for the prize:

1. Malala Yousafazi: She is the Pakistani teenager who survived a shot in the head by a member of the Taliban because she advocated for the right for girls to attend school.

2. Dr. Denis Mukwege: He is a gynecological surgeon in the Democratic Republic of Congo who has operated on and repaired the insides of many Congolese women who were victims of rape despite having been targeted for assassination and exiled. He has returned to continue his work.

3. Dr. Claudia Paz y Paz: She is the first woman to serve as Attorney General in Guatemala and despite constant threats, she the first to prosecute human rights abuses under General Ríos Montt’s dictatorship.

4. Chelsea Manning: Formerly known as Bradley Manning, she leaked the largest cache of government documents to Wikileaks in U.S. history and was convicted by a military jury of violating the Espionage Act.

5. Edward Snowden: He is a government contractor who revealed to the Guardian that the NSA had been spying on American citizens via a program known as PRISM. The revelation spawned numerous other revelations of wiretapping and other surveillance policies, including that of EU and other world officials.

For more information on these five nominees, please go here.

Just for fun, you may also want to test your knowledge about the prize and to whom it has been awarded in the past.

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33 Responses to Who should win the Nobel Peace Prize?

  1. The Telegraph is reporting this morning that “Malala Yousafzai has been awarded the prestigious Sakharov human rights prize by the European Parliament, beating US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden.”

  2. bettykath says:

    The contenders for the Peace prize are all excellent candidates. Maybe they should take back those that was given to Obama, Kissinger, Al Gore (he has his own private plane and a huuuuuge house – he doesn’t walk his talk) and select four.

    I see Malala and Snowden as the primary contenders. Snowden the political favorite b/c so much of the world is total p.o. about what he has revealed and as rebuttal to Obama, a previous winner.

    imo, Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden are whistle blowing heroes. The others on the linked list are also very deserving.

    • elcymoo says:

      I disagree with you about Al Gore. I think it’s impossible to minimize the contributions he’s made to the discussions about the grave dangers we face due to global warming and climate change, beginning decades ago when most people weren’t paying any attention to the looming disaster. The nature of his work, which has been international, and the threats his presence on commercial jets might pose to other passengers and crew justify his use of a private jet. As for his house, it’s my understanding that it’s a family home he inherited, and several years ago, there was discussion of how he was having it modernized and retrofitted to conserve energy. He never preached that we should all tear down our larger homes and rebuild or buy smaller ones; that alone would do more damage to the environment.

  3. The University Herald reports:

    For the hallmark of the event – the Nobel Peace Prize – Øivind Stenersen, an expert on the history of the peace prize specifically, told The Guardian he believes Denis Mukwege of the Democratic Republic of Congo will win. Mukwege has cared for “thousands of women gang-raped and tortured during the civil war,” wrote The Guardian.

    “They pick candidates they know will draw a lot of debate,” Stenersen said. “They want discussions to happen, because those discussions will get us closer to knowing what we need to achieve peace. I’d be surprised if the award didn’t go to this doctor.”

    • Rachael says:

      She is such an amazingly extraordinary young woman. I cry every time I see her – not bad tears, but a different kind of tear than any I’ve ever known – how would one describe such a young, articulate, brave young woman? She has just totally blown me away from the very moment I heard of her and I’ve followed her in awe ever since.

    • bettykath says:

      I watched Stewart’s entire show last night. The full interview with Malala is great. She is amazing.

  4. Dr. Denis Mukwege for me. The 13th century world he operates in is a scary, unforgiving place. He brings light daily and at daily risk to himself and his family. He could be killed at anytime….

    My gut favorite is that heroic young lady, Malala Yousafazi.

    The Ignoble Peace Prize should be shared by the traitors, IMO.

    Raining in LA and man do we need it.

    • Malisha says:

      HamRE, you got that rain because I did a special rain dance for y’all. Nobody knows the rain dance but me.

      I will never do it for Seminole County, Florida. They can dry up and roast and I won’t even wiggle. 😆

      • Mercí Malisha…the fact that you would wiggle a rain dance for us out here is reason enough for me to celebrate the day! As far as the other place goes, feh.

        Keep posting, your always great 😉

  5. O/T: The Orlando Sentinel is reporting today,

    Anderson Cooper will present “Tragedy on Trial: The George Zimmerman Story” at 10 p.m. Sunday. The program is presented under the banner “Anderson Cooper Special Report.”

  6. aussie says:

    IT seems they never officially release the list of nominees. So it’s put together by guesswork and rumour. Here is a short list, some more credible and some less.

    http://www.prio.no/About/PeacePrize/PRIO-Directors-Nobel-Speculations-2013/

    SNOWDEN could not have been nominated except by special dispensation, as he was a complete unknown when nominations closed in February. So maybe he’s not on the list at all.

  7. aussie says:

    The other 3 on this shortlist are deliberately working for the betterment of humanity (or at least their small corner of it) and continue to do so despite threats and actual violence. In that respect they can be figureheads for movements that might eventually lead to genuine and lasting change. A Nobel Prize would certainly lift the profile of their causes.

    I’m not voting yet. I’m off to see who the other nominees are.

  8. aussie says:

    Snowden? much the same applies. His motives are not obvious, but it wasn’t disaffection — he apparently got the job with the intention of finding this material to reveal. Perhaps the ensuing other revelations elsewhere have added to more “peace” for citizens, worldwide. Likely not. It will continue. Knowing about it doesn’t help stop it. Instead of fraternity,has probably led to more hatred of America in other places.

    Anyway I don’t see it appropriate to award the prize either for single incidents, or for actions which are prima facie illegal.

  9. aussie says:

    Manning? a life history of neglect and abuse, from childhood through his military career, and some very bad experiences on tours of duty. A person ready to crack and the military should have known it. I will keep referring to him by his legal name and legal gender — you can’t just change by making a declaration. I see this recently found gender crisis as a means of dissociating from his past. At any rate the taking of the documents was revenge and spite, the ultimate insubordination, nothing heroic or high-minded about it. and has not led to any fraternity of nations or reduction of armies.

    IF the dissemination of Government secrets is to be worthy of a Nobel Prize, perhaps they should consider giving it to Julian Assange, who deliberately set up a MEANS to disseminate such material from all comers with a view to making them truly public not just handed over to “other sides” as more often happens with stolen classified material.

    • Yes, I agree that Julian Assange deserves consideration for the prize.

      I disagree with your point about denying the prize to law breakers. I think there are times when the cause for peace necessitates breaking the law. I believe Manning was in such a situation because conduct in violation of international law was being concealed from public view by classifying it as secret.

      I believe that criminalizing the disclosure of unlawful conduct should not be tolerated and whistle blowers who violate such laws should be regarded as heroes.

      • Malisha says:

        Agree completely.

        Remember, everything the Nazis did in 1933-45 was perfectly legal under German law, and it was being done by Germany. They did not break any laws; the resistance DID break laws.

  10. I should have added that the 5 nominees I mentioned are not the only nominees, so it’s possible someone else will win the prize.

    • Rotten shame school officials chickened out on Trayvon Martin Day and replaced it with a celebration for a sports team.

      How trivial can school officials get?

      • Malisha says:

        Remember, they are teaching the lessons that our public schools want our students to learn: SHUT UP!

        Or, if you want to talk lies like the politicians do: “If you don’t have something inspirational about America to say, don’t say anything at all.”

        Or, if you want to talk “intellectual analysis” like Professor Jonathan Turley did a year ago when a school had a Trayvon Martin day and handed out skittles and iced tea, “It’s too soon,” which will be followed by “It’s too late” and of course, our ever-favored, “why do we need to talk about all that bad stuff?”

        Shame on us as a culture; shame on us as a world power; shame on us as cowards.

  11. MichelleO says:

    Ha! Typical American me: I actually voted without actually educating myself about the other lesser-known selectees. In that case I will have to correct myself:

    1) Dr. Denis Mukwege: He is a gynecological surgeon in the Democratic Republic of Congo who has operated on and repaired the insides of many Congolese women who were victims of rape despite having been targeted for assassination and exiled. He has returned to continue his work.

    2) Dr. Claudia Paz y Paz: She is the first woman to serve as Attorney General in Guatemala and despite constant threats, she the first to prosecute human rights abuses under General Ríos Montt’s dictatorship.

    3) Edward Snowden: He is a government contractor who revealed to the Guardian that the NSA had been spying on American citizens via a program known as PRISM. The revelation spawned numerous other revelations of wiretapping and other surveillance policies, including that of EU and other world officials.

    Talking about unselfishly fighting THE POWER!!!

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